Heritage

Sharing Auld World Amazing Stories Of Ardmore With Visitors

Explore an ancient Christian settlement and where a saint lived and died. Marvel at the monumental Round Tower and Cathedral standing proudly over a beautiful seaside village.

You’ve reached the Historic Village of Ardmore in County Waterford. A place where Christianity was forged by a trail-blazing Saint and who’s name has been carved into this picturesque landscape forever.

Uncover the tales of St Declan. See the amazing architectural achievements laid down forever and perched on a small hilltop above this quiet village. And, read the harrowing tale of a siege that ended with the execution of over 100 men.

This is Ireland’s Ancient East in action and it’s time to explore years of vivid history.

We are pleased to include an article from The Gentleman’s Magazine about Ardmore written in 1864.Read More »Sharing Auld World Amazing Stories Of Ardmore With Visitors

Guaranteed To Stay Forever In Your Brain – The Truth About An Astonishing Story Of Two Murderous Brothers

The Irish have always been known to possess some of the best storytellers in the world.

And, it is also often said that the best stories are nearly always true.

So if you like stories, then you’ll be intrigued by the murderous tale of how two brothers that came to lay side by side in the old graveyard in Ardmore.

It was written in September 1845 and appeared in Frazers Magazine For Town And County.

“Before we leave this crowded cemetery, look at those two remarkably long graves close together, not far from the entrance to St. Declan’s tomb. There lie two brothers, once exceedingly tall, fine young men — but they were murderers, convicted and executed, though the bead- stone merely tells us that John and James Fuge departed this life April 15th, 1805, aged twenty-five and twenty- seven years.Read More »Guaranteed To Stay Forever In Your Brain – The Truth About An Astonishing Story Of Two Murderous Brothers

The Compact Guide To The History Of Ardmore On The Amazing Ireland’s Ancient East

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If you’ve been exploring Ireland’s Ancient East, you’ve discovered that there’s never a dull moment when visitors start to unpick history. When you arrive in Ardmore, you’ll be spoilt for choice.

And, this is a site where stories is shared about Ardmore. Some stories come from visitors, others from those that have called Ardmore home for their entire lives.

Ardmore Waterford

Here are two reports that we particularly like from the start of the 1800s.

Here is a short extract by Wm. Wenman Seward, Esq. in 1797. It is taken from “The topography of Ireland, ancient and modern. Giving a complete view of the civil and ecclesiastical state of that kingdom; with its antiquities, natural curiosities, trade, manufactures, extent, and population.”Read More »The Compact Guide To The History Of Ardmore On The Amazing Ireland’s Ancient East

A Proven Way To Find A Hidden Treasure On The Ardmore Coastline

From a majestic headland to an idyllic bay, the coastline of Ardmore surrounds a village that is full of culture, creativity, music, adventure, unforgettable experiences, and great escapes.

But, there is a hidden treasure that once stood prominently on what is now the main beach in Ardmore.

It was a Crannog and we are pleased to present a wonderful account from 1879 that tells a fascinating story of life within a Crannog.

Read More »A Proven Way To Find A Hidden Treasure On The Ardmore Coastline

No Nudity Here: The Village That Lost Their Bathing-Lodges

In reality, the look and feel of Ardmore has not changed that much over the years. But the bathing lodges seem to have disappeared!!!

The dramatic cliff walk, patchwork of houses, winding trails, a charming village setting, and welcoming locals all lend themselves to creating a wonderful stay in Ardmore.

Ardmore Head

We look back to an early description of a trip from Dublin To Ardmore in 1884.

Screen Shot 2013-08-29 at 14.26.16Screen Shot 2013-08-29 at 14.26.30Read More »No Nudity Here: The Village That Lost Their Bathing-Lodges

Introducing The Man Who Saved Saint Declan’s Well

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Visitors to Saint Declan’s Well will know that they are walking in a place that a Saint spent time in.

But few visitors will know Hugh Byrne. A private soldier in the Donegal militia that dedicated his the end of his life to tending to the Well. He is also said to have been buried next to Declan’s grave.

Some people just make a difference.

And, often they may not even know that their efforts will be remembered after they are gone.

As you walk around the Well next, spare a thought for Hugh.

For the history enthusiasts, we continue this story with a wonderful article from THE DUBLIN PENNY JOURNAL CONDUCTED BY P. DIXON HARDY, M.R.I.A. Vol. III – OCTOBER 4, in 1834. No. 118.

“The village of Ardmore is situated on the coast of the county of Waterford, about four miles from Youghal, and is remarkable for one of the most perfect round towers to be found in Ireland, the origin of which is attributed to St. Declan, who is said to have been the friend and companion of St. Patrick, by whom he was made Bishop of Ardmore, where he founded an abbey about the year 402, and where his memory is still held in great veneration.Read More »Introducing The Man Who Saved Saint Declan’s Well

Why You Desperately Need Lugud’s Leacht And Amazing Ogham Stones

With fantastic itineraries, exciting places to go to, and must-see attractions, plan your perfect trip to Ardmore along Ireland’s Ancient East.

Some must-see objects that you must see when you visit Ardmore is the Ogham Stones. These are located in Ardmore Cathedral.

Ogham is the earliest form of writing in Ireland. And, it dates to around 4th century A.D. It was in use for around 500 years.

And, Ardmore has some great examples for you to explore.

The Ogham alphabet is made up of a series of strokes along or across a line. Often Ogham is referred to as the “Celtic Tree Alphabet”. This is because a number of the letters are linked to old Irish names for certain trees.

The alphabet is normally carved on standing stones to commemorate someone, using the edge of the stone as the centre line.

The marks normally read from the left-hand side bottom up, across the top, and if needed down the other side.

We are pleased to present an article on the Ogham Stones of Ardmore as detailed in the Journal of the Kilkenny and the South East of Ireland (Volume III, 1860-61) written by E. Fitzgerald, Architect.Read More »Why You Desperately Need Lugud’s Leacht And Amazing Ogham Stones